• Jo Hanlon-Moores

One of these things is not like the other


We had a day of snow. Just the one. Looking through the photos on my iPhone you'd be forgiven for thinking I'd moved to northern Sweden. About six months ago. Sadly, not.


But even one day's snow - while inconvenient for things like supermarket runs, visiting ageing parents or getting to the garage for chocolate - makes a muddy, bare landscape look beautiful, while enabling the keen-eyed to get an idea of who else has been in the area recently. So wrapped in as many layers as I could carry (could I BE wearing any more clothes?), I set out.


As you can see from the gallery, the stars of the morning were actually the two horses who live opposite us. Beyond photogenic and happy to play it all moody 'n'stuff, they let the glorious light bounce off them while I pointed and shooted like a fool.


Elsewhere, the only animal life visible was in the tracks they left, and one of them is a bit of a mystery.


Take a look...


Bottom right: birds. Near a stream. One of them could conceivably have webbed feet but I think not. It's more likely to be the way the snow collapsed. The only water birds I ever see there are ducks and these prints were too small.


Bottom left: Roe Deer. Markedly bigger than the print of the other species of deer we have here, the Muntjac. Around here, deer tracks are often mixed in with dog prints. Keep 'em on a lead, people. Please.


Top left: I'm going to take a semi-educated guess and say these are the back feet of a hare. I've seen them before, more clearly, and I often see Brown Hares in this field.


Top right: I present, The Mystery Shot. These four lines were in absolute isolation. No other prints of any kind for metres around. The two in the middle were about seven inches long. My only (rather desperate) guess is that they were left by the tips of wing feathers on a low-flying bird, but they're very deep and narrow, and a bit too 'tidy', so...


If you have any other ideas, drop us a line.

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© 2021  Jo Hanlon-Moores & Charlie Moores